About Me

My photo
Lift your lamp beside the golden door, Break not the golden rule, avoid well the golden calf, know; not all that glitters is gold, and laissez faire et laissez passer [let do and let pass] but as a shining sentinel, hesitate not to ring the bell, defend the gates, and man the wall

Saturday, January 30, 2010

Quotes & Writings Referenced by Dr. Michael Savage









________________________________________________________________________________________________

Ernest Hemingway

"The Truth Has a certain Ring to it..."
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Nietzsche "There is a Joy in Madness that only Madmen know."

________________________________________________________________________________________________

Juvenal (Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis)

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

“who will watch the watchers?” or "who will guard the guardians themselves?"
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Voltaire

"I may disagree with what you have to say, but I shall defend to the death your right to say it."
________________________________________________________________________________________________

John Burroughs

"When you bait the hook with your heart, the fish always bite."

paraphrase by Dr. Savage-

"If you bait your hook with your heart the fish will always bite"
________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Art of War, by Sun Tzu

"Subjugating the enemy's army without fighting is the true pinnacle of excellence"
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Lao Tsu

'It doesn't matter who gets the credit for it, as long as your ideas are being Disseminated' -paraphrased

"Do the difficult things while they are easy and do the great things while they are small.
A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step."
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Rabbi Hillel
Jewish scholar And Theologian (30 BC - 9 AD)

"If I am not for myself, who will be for me?
If I am not for others, what am I?
And if not now, when?"

Paraphrase by Dr. Savage-

"If I'm Not For Myself Who Will Be?"
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Marcus Tullius Cicero

"Hell is paved with good intentions"

Paraphrased to
"The Road To Hell Is Paved With Good Intentions" sometime after Samuel Johnson quoted Cicero

-Quote-

“A nation can survive its fools, and even the
ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from
within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable,
for he is known and carries his banner openly.
But the traitor moves amongst those within the
gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through
all the alleys, heard in the very halls of
government itself. For the traitor appears not
a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his
victims, and he wears their face and their
arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies
deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul
of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in
the night to undermine the pillars of the city,
he infects the body politic so that it can no
longer resist. A murderer is less to fear. The
traitor is the plague.”
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dr. Michael Savage

"I pray to God that we will one day return America to her glorious roots of freedom, aith, and family. Yes, this book [The Enemy Within] is about the America that once was, and the America that could be again---if you have the will to stand and fight against the Enemy Within."

"Only a more savage nation can survive, Not a more compassionate nation. The country will not survive if we keep wallowing in this false compassion. We're not going to survive by being overly compassionate to our enemies. It's common sense. Most Americans will agree with me, except those in Hollywood on crack."

"Well-intentioned liberal programs, plans, and ideas often lead to terrible results. While the impulse for helping others is well intentioned, the results often border on insanity."

"It is on the fringes of compassion and the jagged border of anarchy to want to erase our borders our language and our culture."

 "Each day is an adventure into the unknown. There are many "stories" in everyday occurrences: every day brings the opportunity for joy, compassion, redemption.
   By listening, we can learn to hear again
   By observing, we can learn to see again.
   By conversing we can learn to speak again.
   Only by turning off the media-fed stories can we hear our own story, and by shutting of the stream of images can we see what is real. By speaking and listening, even in the market, we can, again, capture our own voice"
________________________________________________________________________________________________

American pastoral by Philip Roth

"And yet what are we to do about this terribly significant business of other people... ? Is everyone to go off and lock the door and sit secluded like lonely writers do, in a soundproof cell, summoning people out of words and then proposing that these word people are closer to the real thing than the real people that we mangle with our ignorance every day? The fact remains that getting people right is not what living is all about anyway. It's getting them wrong that is living, getting them wrong and wrong and wrong and then, on careful reconsideration, getting them wrong again." (p. 35)
________________________________________________________________________________________________

ON LIBERTY by
John Stuart Mill
(1859)

CHAPTER III
ON INDIVIDUALITY, AS ONE OF THE ELEMENTS OF WELLBEING

"In this age the mere example of non-conformity, the mere refusal to bend the knee to custom, is itself a service. Precisely because the tyranny of opinion is such as to make eccentricity a reproach, it is desirable, in order to break through that tyranny, that people should be eccentric. Eccentricity has always abounded when and where strength of character has abounded; and the amount of eccentricity in a society has generally been proportional to the amount of genius, mental vigor, and moral courage which it contained. That so few now dare to be eccentric, marks the chief danger of the time."

On Liberty by John Stuart Mill 1859
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dylan Thomas - Do Not Go Gentle Into that Good Night

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Weather Vein by Michael Savage

“I am Moses,
I am Abraham.
I am Isaac,
I am Charlagmane.
I am John Wayne,
I am Coltrane.
They try to suppress me,
try to redress me.
Call me incorrect,
deserving no respect.
I am Patton,
I am Hatton,
even Mt. Batten.
I am Eisenhower,
not a wallflower.
I am Washington,
I am Pershing.
I am McCarther,
I am Kipling.
I am Audie Murphey
and I am Sky King.
They’ll steal your crown,
trample you down.
Take your good name,
and put it to shame.
I am Gene Autry,
I am Roy Rodgers.
I am Tom Mix.
They try to push me,
over the River Styx.
But it won’t mix,
with my true blood,
which runs thick for America.
I am the bane,
of those vain.
I am the Weather Vein!
I am Michael Savage “

Copyright 2009 Michael Savage, Talk Radio Network All Rights Reserved.
________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Myth of Sisyphus

In the last chapter, Camus outlines the legend of Sisyphus who defied the gods and put Death in chains so that no human needed to die. When Death was eventually liberated and it came time for Sisyphus himself to die, he concocted a deceit which let him escape from the underworld. Finally captured, the gods decided on his punishment: for all eternity, he would have to push a rock up a mountain; on the top, the rock rolls down again and Sisyphus has to start over. Camus sees Sisyphus as the absurd hero who lives life to the fullest, hates death and is condemned to a meaningless task.

Camus presents Sisyphus's ceaseless and pointless toil as a metaphor for modern lives spent working at futile jobs in factories and offices. "The workman of today works every day in his life at the same tasks, and this fate is no less absurd. But it is tragic only at the rare moments when it becomes conscious."

Camus is interested in Sisyphus' thoughts when marching down the mountain, to start anew. This is the truly tragic moment, when the hero becomes conscious of his wretched condition. He does not have hope, but "[t]here is no fate that cannot be surmounted by scorn." Acknowledging the truth will conquer it; Sisyphus, just like the absurd man, keeps pushing. Camus claims that when Sisyphus acknowledges the futility of his task and the certainty of his fate, he is freed to realize the absurdity of his situation and to reach a state of contented acceptance. With a nod to the similarly cursed Greek hero Oedipus, Camus concludes that "all is well," indeed, that "One must imagine Sisyphus happy."
________________________________________________________________________________________________

“If” by Rudyard Kipling

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you
But make allowance for their doubting too,
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don't deal in lies,
Or being hated, don't give way to hating,
And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise:

If you can dream--and not make dreams your master,
If you can think--and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build 'em up with worn-out tools:

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on!"

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with kings--nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you;
If all men count with you, but none too much,
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds' worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
And--which is more--you'll be a Man, my son!
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mending Wall, by Robert Frost

Something there is that doesn't love a wall,
That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it,
And spills the upper boulders in the sun,
And makes gaps even two can pass abreast.
The work of hunters is another thing:
I have come after them and made repair
Where they have left not one stone on a stone,
But they would have the rabbit out of hiding,
To please the yelping dogs. The gaps I mean,
No one has seen them made or heard them made,
But at spring mending-time we find them there.
I let my neighbor know beyond the hill;
And on a day we meet to walk the line
And set the wall between us once again.
We keep the wall between us as we go.
To each the boulders that have fallen to each.
And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
We have to use a spell to make them balance:
'Stay where you are until our backs are turned!'
We wear our fingers rough with handling them.
Oh, just another kind of out-door game,
One on a side. It comes to little more:
There where it is we do not need the wall:
He is all pine and I am apple orchard.
My apple trees will never get across
And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him.
He only says, 'Good fences make good neighbors'.
Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder
If I could put a notion in his head:
'Why do they make good neighbors? Isn't it
Where there are cows?
But here there are no cows.
Before I built a wall I'd ask to know
What I was walling in or walling out,
And to whom I was like to give offence.
Something there is that doesn't love a wall,
That wants it down.' I could say 'Elves' to him,
But it's not elves exactly, and I'd rather
He said it for himself. I see him there
Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top
In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed.
He moves in darkness as it seems to me~
Not of woods only and the shade of trees.
He will not go behind his father's saying,
And he likes having thought of it so well
He says again, "Good fences make good neighbors."

(1914)
________________________________________________________________________________________________

“ It Can't Happen Here” by Sinclair Lewis

-The Fifteen Points of Victory-

(1) All finance in the country, including banking, insurance, stocks and bonds and mortgages, shall be under the absolute control of a Federal Central Bank, owned by the government and conducted by a Board appointed by the President, which Board shall, without need of recourse to Congress for legislative authorization, be empowered to make all regulations governing finance. Thereafter, as soon as may be practicable, this said Board shall consider the nationalization and government-ownership, for the Profit of the Whole People, of all mines, oilfields, water power, public utilities, transportation, and communication.
Reply With Quote

(2) The President shall appoint a commission, equally divided between manual workers, employers, and representatives of the Public, to determine which Labor Unions are qualified to represent the Workers; and report to the Executive, for legal action, all pretended labor organizations, whether "Company Unions," or "Red Unions," controlled by Communists and the so-called "Third International." The duly recognized Unions shall be constituted Bureaus of the Government, with power of decision in all labor disputes. Later, the same investigation and official recognition shall be extended to farm organizations. In this elevation of the position of the Worker, it shall be emphasized that the League of Forgotten Men is the chief bulwark against the menace of destructive and un-American Radicalism.

(3) In contradistinction to the doctrines of Red Radicals, with their felonious expropriation of the arduously acquired possessions which insure to aged persons their security, this League and Party will guarantee Private Initiative and the Right to Private Property for all time.

(4) Believing that only under God Almighty, to Whom we render all homage, do we Americans hold our vast Power, we shall guarantee to all persons absolute freedom of religious worship, provided, however, that no atheist, agnostic, believer in Black Magic, nor any Jew who shall refuse to swear allegiance to the New Testament, nor any person of any faith who refuses to take the Pledge to the Flag, shall be permitted to hold any public office or to practice as a teacher, professor, lawyer, judge, or as a physician, except in the category of Obstetrics.

(5) Annual net income per person shall be limited to $500,000. No accumulated fortune may at any one time exceed $3,000,000 per person. No one person shall, during his entire lifetime, be permitted to retain an inheritance or various inheritances in total exceeding $2,000,000. All incomes or estates in excess of the sums named shall be seized by the Federal Government for use in Relief and in Administrative expenses.

(6) Profit shall be taken out of War by seizing all dividends over and above 6 per cent that shall be received from the manufacture, distribution, or sale, during Wartime, of all arms, munitions, aircraft, ships, tanks, and all other things directly applicable to warfare, as well as from food, textiles, and all other supplies furnished to the American or to any allied army.

(7) Our armaments and the size of our military and naval establishments shall be consistently enlarged until they shall equal, but--since this country has no desire for foreign conquest of any kind--not surpass, in every branch of the forces of defense, the martial strength of any other single country or empire in the world. Upon inauguration, this League and Party shall make this its first obligation, together with the issuance of a firm proclamation to all nations of the world that our armed forces are to be maintained solely for the purpose of insuring world peace and amity.

(8) Congress shall have the sole right to issue money and immediately upon our inauguration it shall at least double the present supply of money, in order to facilitate the fluidity of credit.

(9) We cannot too strongly condemn the un-Christian attitude of certain otherwise progressive nations in their discriminations against the Jews, who have been among the strongest supporters of the League, and who will continue to prosper and to be recognized as fully Americanized, though only so long as they continue to support our ideals.

(10) All Negroes shall be prohibited from voting, holding public office, practicing law, medicine, or teaching in any class above the grade of grammar school, and they shall be taxed 100 per cent of all sums in excess of $10,000 per family per year which they may earn or in any other manner receive. In order, however, to give the most sympathetic aid possible to all Negroes who comprehend their proper and valuable place in society, all such colored persons, male or female, as can prove that they have devoted not less than forty-five years to such suitable tasks as domestic service, agricultural labor, and common labor in industries, shall at the age of sixty-five be permitted to appear before a special Board, composed entirely of white persons, and upon proof that while employed they have never been idle except through sickness, they shall be recommended for pensions not to exceed the sum of $500.00 per person per year, nor to exceed $700.00 per family. Negroes shall, by definition, be persons with at least one sixteenth colored blood.

(11) Far from opposing such high-minded and economically sound methods of the relief of poverty, unemployment, and old age as the EPIC plan of the Hon. Upton Sinclair, the "Share the Wealth" and "Every Man a King" proposals of the late Hon. Huey Long to assure every family $5000 a year, the Townsend plan, the Utopian plan, Technocracy, and all competent schemes of unemployment insurance, a Commission shall immediately be appointed by the New Administration to study, reconcile, and recommend for immediate adoption the best features in these several plans for Social Security, and the Hon. Messrs. Sinclair, Townsend, Eugene Reed, and Howard Scott are herewith invited to in every way advise and collaborate with that Commission.

(12) All women now employed shall, as rapidly as possible, except in such peculiarly feminine spheres of activity as nursing and beauty parlors, be assisted to return to their incomparably sacred duties as home-makers and as mothers of strong, honorable future Citizens of the Commonwealth.

(13) Any person advocating Communism, Socialism, or Anarchism, advocating refusal to enlist in case of war, or advocating alliance with Russia in any war whatsoever, shall be subject to trial for high treason, with a minimum penalty of twenty years at hard labor in prison, and a maximum of death on the gallows, or other form of execution which the judges may find convenient.

(14) All bonuses promised to former soldiers of any war in which America has ever engaged shall be immediately paid in full, in cash, and in all cases of veterans with incomes of less than $5,000.00 a year, the formerly promised sums shall be doubled.

(15) Congress shall, immediately upon our inauguration, initiate amendments to the Constitution providing (a), that the President shall have the authority to institute and execute all necessary measures for the conduct of the government during this critical epoch; (b), that Congress shall serve only in an advisory capacity, calling to the attention of the President and his aides and Cabinet any needed legislation, but not acting upon same until authorized by the President so to act; and (c), that the Supreme Court shall immediately have removed from its jurisdiction the power to negate, by ruling them to be unconstitutional or by any other judicial action, any or all acts of the President, his duly appointed aides, or Congress.

-Page 69-

They realized that this country has gone so flabby, that any gang daring enough and unscrupulous enough and smart enough not to seem illegal can grab hold of the entire government and have all the power applause and salutes all the money and palaces and will and women they want, they're only a hand full but just think how small Lenin's gang was at first, And Mussolini’s and Hitler's And Camal Posh's and Napoleon’s, you'll see all the liberal preachers and modernist educators and discontented newspapermen and farm Agitators  maybe they'll worry at first but they'll get caught up in the web of propaganda like we all were in the great war and they'll all be convinced that even if our president maybe he has a few faults but he's on the side of the plain people and against all the tight old political machines and they'll rouse the country for him as the great liberator but will Americans stand for it long? Whimpered Emma, Oh no not people like us the descendents of the pioneers, oh no, it can't happen here.....
________________________________________________________________________________________________



"I Am Zarathustra!" -Savage (when getting barnacles sanded off his back without anesthesia...) [jokingly]
________________________________________________________________________________________________

All My Sons-


________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman: is a novel by Laurence Sterne in the form of a poioumenon.[1] It was published in nine volumes, the first two appearing in 1759, and seven others following over the next 10 years. It was not always held in high esteem by other writers (Samuel Johnson responded that, "Nothing odd will do long. Tristram Shandy did not last.")[2][3], but its bawdy humour was popular with London society, and it has come to be seen as one of the greatest comic novels in English, as well as a forerunner for many modern narrative devices and styles, such as visual writing.
As its title suggests, the book is ostensibly Tristram's narration of his life story. But it is one of the central jokes of the novel that he cannot explain anything simply, that he must make explanatory diversions to add context and colour to his tale, to the extent that we do not even reach Tristram's own birth until Volume III.
Consequently, apart from Tristram as narrator, the most familiar and important characters in the book are his father Walter, his mother, his Uncle Toby, Toby's servant Trim, and a supporting cast of popular minor characters including the maid, Susannah, Doctor Slop and the parson, Yorick.
Most of the action is concerned with domestic upsets or misunderstandings, which find humour in the opposing temperaments of Walter—splenetic, rational and somewhat sarcastic—and Uncle Toby, who is gentle, uncomplicated and a lover of his fellow man.
________________________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________________


___________________________________________________________________________________

Quotes Sorted by Age
___________________________________________________________________________________
[Quotes of Antiquity] before 1700







___________________________________________________________________________________
[Quotes of the Founding Age] 1700s to late 1800s







 ___________________________________________________________________________________
[Quotes of Modernity] from the Birth of Futurism to the new Millenium








 ___________________________________________________________________________________
[Quotes and Writings Referenced by Dr. Savage] the name says it all
 






__________________________________________________________________________________

Agelessly Sorted Quotes  
___________________________________________________________________________________
[Aphorisms] Latin and Colloquialisms







___________________________________________________________________________________

[Words To Fear, Ideas To Expose] evil ideas that need light's disinfection







__________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________
 

No comments:

Post a Comment

Sociable